Dear Web Developers

Make it work it before you make it nice. Or better yet – make it work perfectly before adding the visual pizza.

Thank you,
Bruce

Saw the above on Twitter by Rian Rietveld who was giving a talk on web accessibility at a WordPress WordCamp conference

Peter Ramsing: The Ongoing Adventures of a Front End Developer

Here’s the video of Peter Ramsing‘s talk entitled “The Ongoing Adventures of a Front End Developer” which he delivered at Clark College on Wednesday afternoon. Let me just say that web development technologies have been rapidly evolving over the past several years. A day doesn’t go by when a new language, library, tool, technique isn’t trying to grab your attention. Peter talks about this and how important it is to maintain your focus. On behalf of Clark College thank you, Peter.

Here are some links

to things mentioned during Peter’s talk.

Why I Teach Reason No. 17

I just received this feedback from Troy Uyan’s presentation at Clark College earlier this week:

I just finished Troy’s presentation. He is an extraordinary individual. If I didn’t know any better, I would think he had at least 5 to 10 years experience. He is extremely accomplished in such a short time. His story about realizing that if a textbook had 13 chapters and only 8 were covered he would finish the other five chapters was very telling about his desire to excel.

Troy was a former student of mine who completed the Web Development program at Clark College, located in Vancouver, Washington.

Watch Troy’s talk https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8sPON2O4_q8

Troy Uyan: Beginning a Web Development Career in the Public Sector

This week’s speaker is a Clark College Alum success story. A few years ago, Troy Uyan was a Clark Running Start student exploring career options.  He is currently employed as a web developer for the government of Clark County. He talks about how Clark’s CTEC Web Development program helped prepare him for his job and share impressions of his current world of work.

Here’s a video of Troy’s talk given at Clark College on Wednesday, September 28, 2016:

Business Web Practices Speaker Series Week Two

When: Wednesday, September 28
Where: Clark College, Foster Hall Auditorium 4:30 pm
Session Title: Beginning a Web Development Career in the Public Sector
Session Speaker: Troy Uyan, Web Developer, Clark County Government, Washington State

10574382_10204159801652776_7366325592698039019_n

This week’s speaker is also a Clark College Alum success story.  A few years ago, Troy Uyan was a Clark Running Start student exploring career options.  He is currently employed as a web developer for the government of Clark County. He’ll talk about how Clark’s CTEC Web Development program helped prepare him for his job and share impressions of his current world of work. 

This event  is a part of The Business Web Practices Speaker Series curated by Clark Instructor Bruce Elgort. It is held on Wednesdays throughout  Fall Quarter, 4:30-5:50PM, Main Clark Campus,  Foster Auditorium (FHL 126).  This event focuses on business leaders as well as those with successful careers in web development providing their insights on opportunities and challenges that face those who practice commerce and provide services for our local communities. All sessions are free and open to the Clark community and the public at large. 

Be sure to check out the complete list of programs and speakers as well as videos of past speakers.

APIs for Dummies – A Free eBook by IBM

Modern business ecosystems need to rethink their approach to innovation and integration. This eBook is your guide to applying the power of APIs to business challenges ranging from changing business models to embracing a world of devices and sensors.

Get the eBook >

Jealousy, Envy & Complacency

Being a creative professional is amazing, but there is a trio of deadly emotions that can cause you to doubt your abilities, spend more time obsessing over other people, and become lazy: jealousy, envy, and complacency. Chris Martin shares how he struggles with these emotions and five ways to fight them. The secret weapon? Gratitude.

Listen now to this episode of the Getting Work To Work Podcast >

2016/2017 Must-Know Web Development Tech: Watch this if you want to be a web developer

Everything You Ever Wanted To Know About Images

Jessica Tate, senior user experience designer at Portland’s ThinkShout gave a very good presentation at Devsigner entitled “Everything You Ever Wanted To Know About Images”.

On the outside, images on the web seem simple: save an image, compress it, and upload it to a website. If only it were that easy. What file type do I use? What size compression (or k-weight) should I aim for? What way is the “proper” way to save an image for the web? Are there different rules for images in Drupal and WordPress? If you’ve asked yourself any one of these questions, then this is the perfect session for you.

We will begin by setting a baseline for image standards and the basics of images as applied to the web. We will explore guidelines and practical applications of saving images for web optimization, image file types, and what they are best used for from a technical perspective.

Here’s a link to her slide deck which is packed with great information.

Taking control of the Browser Security Model

This past weekend at the Devsigner Conference held in Portland, Oregon, Dylan Tack gave an excellent presentation entitled “Taking control of the Browser Security Model”:

Since the birth of the web, the browser security model has remained nearly static. Recent evolutions make it possible for site operators to fine-tune the security model, and enforce mandatory access controls. This session will focus on Content-Security-Policy, and other browser security features like Strict Transport Security and Public Key Pins.

47% of all web applications have a cross-site-scripting vulnerability, and this potential security flaw ranks in the top three classes of all vulnerabilities. [ White Hat Security, 2015 Website Security Statistics Report ]

A Content Security Policy is a systematic way to block these attacks, by whitelisting allowed sources of script, style, and other resources. The holy grail – blocking “unsafe-inline” code – offers the strongest defense, but can be a big surprise for front-end developers when inline scripts and styles stop working!

If you are developing for the web you need to take a look at his slide deck. If you have any questions, feel free to let let me know.