“How to Canvas” – The YouTube Channel for Teachers Using the Canvas LMS

The How to Canvas channel is dedicated to helping teachers enhance their abilities as they navigate the Canvas LMS. Discover tips and tricks of the platform as we create and curate content, enable settings, embed technology, and design teaching and learning communities for our students. Have fun exploring Canvas with me and make sure to subscribe so you can become a Canvas expert.

YouTube Channel: https://www.youtube.com/c/HowToCanvas/about

There’s also an accompanying website at https://www.howtocanvas.com/

Dear Web Developers

Make it work it before you make it nice. Or better yet – make it work perfectly before adding the visual pizza.

Thank you,
Bruce

Saw the above on Twitter by Rian Rietveld who was giving a talk on web accessibility at a WordPress WordCamp conference

Chris Lema: Getting the first two minutes of your talk right

As with anything, writing or speaking is something you get better at over time. The more you do it, the calmer you get, the more muscle memory you have, and ultimately, the faster you can get things done.

But when it comes to speaking, I notice that there are people who’ve been speaking for years and they continue to make a classic mistake every time they start a talk.

Don’t get me wrong – it’s not a horrible mistake. But it’s done so often, by so many people, that it’s easy to not think of it as a mistake.

More >

Don’t Distract New Programmers with OOP

Thomas Gumz sent me a link to a blog entry entitled “Don’t Distract New Programmers with OOP“. Having just wrapped up one year of teaching “Intro to Programming and Problem Solving” to students at Clark College, I could not agree more. One of the core outcomes of my class is centered around functional decomposition – how to break down a problem into smaller, simpler parts.

When I get asked “What’s a good first programming language to teach my [son / daughter / other-person-with-no-programming-experience]?” my answer has been the same for the last 5+ years: Python.

I get this same question almost on a daily basis from so many people. Admittedly, before I started teaching the class I questioned the use of Python for new programmers. Well, guess what? It’s the perfect language and I have the results to prove it.

Did we cover object oriented programming in the class – yes, but not to the level that most would expect. We did just enough for students to wrap their heads around the concept. In fact, one student tried to use OOP for their final project and had a heck of a time. In fact this student was pushing for more OOP content and after the class concluded they admitted that OOP was much harder then they expected it to be.

The shift from procedural to OO brings with it a shift from thinking about problems and solutions to thinking about architecture. That’s easy to see just by comparing a procedural Python program with an object-oriented one. The latter is almost always longer, full of extra interface and indentation and annotations. The temptation is to start moving trivial bits of code into classes and adding all these little methods and anticipating methods that aren’t needed yet but might be someday.

Be sure and read the blog entry as I think that you will agree with avoiding OOP in an introductory programming class. If you are interested in learning more about pursuing a programming career drop me an email as I would love to help.

You can read what others are saying about this article on Yacker News.

More >