Learn PHP and SQL this Fall!

Hello!

Are you interested in learning PHP and SQL? If so, please consider taking my course this fall which is being offered on Tuesday’s and Thursday’s from 10:30am-12:50pm at Clark College located in Vancouver, Washington.

Got questions? Please ask.

If you could share this post with your friends I would really appreciate it.

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I Do Not Agree

Going to shit

2015 is when web development went to shit. Web development used to be nice. You could fire up a text editor and start creating JS and CSS files. You can absolutely still do this. That has not changed. So yes, everything I’m about to say can be invalidated by saying that.

Read “The Sad State of Web Development” >

Here’s what I am teaching this winter at Clark College

For the winter quarter I will be teaching the following courses at Clark College in Vancouver, Washington:

  1. CTEC 121: Intro to Programming and Problem Solving (Python) – 5 credits
  2. CTEC 122: HTML Fundamentals (HTML/HTML5/CSS) – 4 credits
  3. CTEC 127: PHP/MySQL 1 – 5 credits

If you are interested in taking any of these classes please let me know.

This is why I teach at Clark College

I just received this message from a graduate of the Clark College Web Development program:

Hey Bruce! Just wanted to say hi and give you an update. I’ve been at my front end developer job for almost three months and I received an awesome 90 day review from my employer (they had nothing bad to say about me and everything is going well). So this career has been pretty awesome for me so far. You really made a difference in my life when you mentored me because I wouldn’t have gotten this far without your guidance.

I am very blessed.

A Complete Guide to Flexbox

The Flexbox Layout (Flexible Box) module (currently a W3C Last Call Working Draft) aims at providing a more efficient way to lay out, align and distribute space among items in a container, even when their size is unknown and/or dynamic (thus the word “flex”).

The main idea behind the flex layout is to give the container the ability to alter its items’ width/height (and order) to best fill the available space (mostly to accommodate to all kind of display devices and screen sizes). A flex container expands items to fill available free space, or shrinks them to prevent overflow.

Most importantly, the flexbox layout is direction-agnostic as opposed to the regular layouts (block which is vertically-based and inline which is horizontally-based). While those work well for pages, they lack flexibility (no pun intended) to support large or complex applications (especially when it comes to orientation changing, resizing, stretching, shrinking, etc.).

CSS Tricks – A Complete Guide to Flexbox >

Where you can find me for the next few months

Here’s my teaching schedule for the Winter Quarter at Clark College:

  • Monday/Wednesday: CTEC 121 – Intro to Programming and Problem Solving at Clark College/Washington State University (2-4:20pm/Room 104)
  • Tuesday/Thursday: CTEC 122 – HTML Fundamentals (12-1:50pm/Room SHL 124) and CTEC 127 – PHP with SQL (3:30-5:50pm/Room SHL 124)

My office is SHL 127 located in Scarpelli Hall.

Two Years as a College Professor

This month I completed my second year as a professor at Clark College. In that time I have taught HTML Fundamentals, JavaScript, Intro to Programming and Problem Solving with Python, PHP with SQL 1 and PHP with SQL 2. In that time I have taught 500 students, received the 2013 Exceptional Faculty Award and have made many new friends and colleagues. It seems like just yesterday that I was discussing the opportunity of teaching at Clark with MarkyMark, Matt and Ben. Thanks guys for your guidance and friendship.

My friends Ed and Volker call this my “encore career” and I couldn’t be happier and in a better place than where I am now.

Derek Featherstone: CSS, Accessibility, and You

Here’s a free, hour-long talk that Derek Featherstone recently delivered at the CSS Developer Conference in New Orleans.

When most people think about accessibility, they think about HTML as the foundation for accessibility. It makes perfect sense — strong semantic HTML has a huge impact on a visually impaired person using a screen reader. But, what about people with other disabilities? The truth is, there are many more people with low-vision out there than there are blind. There are more fully-sighted keyboard users in the wild than there are non-sighted keyboard users. And there are a huge number of other disabilities that most people don’t even consider when they build their sites and applications. In order to provide the best of user experience to people of all abilities, we must move beyond “write great HTML and you’ll be accessible.” To do that, we use CSS. In this session, we’ll share with you some of the most significant accessibility challenges we face when it comes to the web today and share with you solutions for addressing those head on with the CSS you write. You’ll learn all about the issues, AND know what to do about them.

Watch the video >

Classes I am Teaching at Clark College this Fall

For the Fall Quarter I will be teaching the following courses at Clark College in Vancouver, Washington:

  1. CTEC 121 (class full): Intro to Programming and Problem Solving (Python) – 5 credits
  2. CTEC 122 (class full): HTML Fundamentals (HTML/HTML5/CSS) – 4 credits
  3. CTEC 122 (seats available): HTML Fundamentals. This class will be for the Vancouver Public Schools iTech Program at Washington State University (HTML/HTML5/CSS) – 4 credits
  4.  CTEC 126 (seats available): JavaScript – 5 credits

If you are interested in taking any of these classes please let me know.

Clark College Arbor Day Celebrates Trees and Technology

VANCOUVER, Wash. – On April 9 at 11:00 a.m., Clark College will celebrate both the natural and digital worlds at its annual Arbor Day event, as it adds two new trees to the campus’s beautiful arboretum and unveils a new, student-designed website that uses digital technology to catalog that arboretum. The new online map will allow visitors to instantly access descriptions of most trees on campus through their mobile devices.

The mobile-friendly online map is the product of work done by students in Clark’s spring 2013 Web Design II class. The students worked with the college’s Campus Tree Advisory Committee to identify trees in the campus’s extensive arboretum, which includes such notable trees as a six-decade-old Scarlet Oak and 100 Shirofugen blossoming cherry trees donated to the campus by Japanese businessman John Kageyama in 1990. Students then GPS-tagged each tree and added it to the map with information about its genus and species. Additional students contributed to the project in subsequent quarters, with faculty from both the Computer Graphics Technology and the Computer Technology departments providing guidance.

“I look forward to the sight of Clark College denizens and those in the community at large walking across campus consulting their phones and tablets to find the answer to ‘What kind of tree is this?'” said Computer Technology Department Head Robert Hughes, who also teaches in the Computer Graphics Technology program. “Project-based client work has been a component of our graphics and web-related curriculum for a long time.  These types of experiences are helpful as our students move into the workforce.”

Clark College Arboretum

The Spring Clark College CGT 206 Web Design II project team that developed this app were:

Gus Torres: Instructor
Project Lead: Jaime Wright
Lead Designer: Marina Kaminskaya
Lead Developer: David Edenholm
Design Assistant: Julie Morrell
Development Assistant: Teri Talbot

Additional production contributions made by students Jake Brosius, Chris Masoner, and Christine Thompson.

Additional Faculty coordination and support by Bruce Elgort, Robert Hughes and Kristl Plinz.

More >