Tag Archives: accessibility

Twitter for iOS Adds Accessibility

The Twitter fo iOS app added a panel for accessibility. To access the panel tap on the gear in your profile and then tap on “Settings”. Next tap on “Display and sound” and then you will be presented with this panel:

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Thank you Twitter for adding these options.

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Your Email Says Absolutely Nothing

Here’s the sound a blind person hears when their screen reader reads your email aloud that only contains a graphical image announcing an event:

“Image, Event announcement”

Pro Tip: Don’t send email messages that have all the content in your super cool Photoshop/MSPaint graphic.

Derek Featherstone: CSS, Accessibility, and You

Here’s a free, hour-long talk that Derek Featherstone recently delivered at the CSS Developer Conference in New Orleans.

When most people think about accessibility, they think about HTML as the foundation for accessibility. It makes perfect sense — strong semantic HTML has a huge impact on a visually impaired person using a screen reader. But, what about people with other disabilities? The truth is, there are many more people with low-vision out there than there are blind. There are more fully-sighted keyboard users in the wild than there are non-sighted keyboard users. And there are a huge number of other disabilities that most people don’t even consider when they build their sites and applications. In order to provide the best of user experience to people of all abilities, we must move beyond “write great HTML and you’ll be accessible.” To do that, we use CSS. In this session, we’ll share with you some of the most significant accessibility challenges we face when it comes to the web today and share with you solutions for addressing those head on with the CSS you write. You’ll learn all about the issues, AND know what to do about them.

Watch the video >

Basic Facts and Resources You Need to Know Now About Web Accessibility

Here are some great resources that my colleague Lorelle VanFossen has put together regarding web accessibility. Have a read and let me know if web accessibility is part of your design work.

Lorelle on WordPress

WordPress Themes Last night I gave a presentation for an amazing group of web designers and developers in Portland, Oregon. I spoke about web accessibility, a long time passion of mine. My co-presenter was Winslow Parker from the Oregon Commission for the Blind who has been teaching screen reading and computer techniques to the blind. He’s also a long time expert and consultant for JAWS Screen Reading Software . He also happens to be blind, so his passion for his work is tightly mixed with his passion for life and accessibility.

Glenda Watson Hyatt, author of How Pour is Your Blog free ebookAs I stood before the crowd at WebTrends, beside me in spirit are two of the world’s passionate leaders in web accessibility. Glenda Watson Hyatt, author of Blog Accessibility and the free ebook, The POUR Ebook: Standards, Tips, and Techniques for Meeting Web Accessibility Standards, and Aaron Gustafso, author of Adaptive Web Design: Crafting Rich Experiences with Progressive…

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Negativity Sandwich: Accessibility and Building a web for everyone because sometimes it’s not all about us

Jenn Schiffer shares her thoughts on why accessibility is important. Students who have taken my HTML Fundamentals (CTEC 122) class at Clark College are taught web accessibility and why it’s important from day one of class.

I’m going to talk about accessibility. Not how to make your sites accessible, because there are plenty of resources (which I list some of below) but why it’s important. I feel like awareness is the issue with this subject and I have a big mouth so awareness is a space I can own.

More >

Mac-cessibility Network: All Things Accessibility for Apple Products

On the October 13, 2013 episode of the legendary MacCast, Adam Christianson interviews  Josh de Lioncourt, a blind Apple products user. Josh is part of the Maccessibility Network which focusses on accessibility of Apple products:

Maccessibility is devoted to connecting, compiling, and providing easy access to the best resources for blind, visually impaired, and other disability groups using Apple products. It is maintained by a dedicated group of visually impaired volunteers, who are Apple enthusiasts themselves.

Maccessibility began in 2007 as a project on Lioncourt.com to provide news and informational materials to low and no vision users of the Mac platform. Additionally, it served as a resource to dispel false information regarding the accessibility of Apple products.

As somebody who relies on accessibility on both OS X and iOS I am surprised I didn’t know about the Maccessibility site sooner. Many thanks to Adam for a great interview with Josh and for his awesome MacCast podcast.